Social Security Number

On August 1, 2017, a unanimous three-judge panel for the D.C. Circuit reversed the dismissal of a putative data breach class action against health insurer CareFirst, Attias v. CareFirst, Inc., No. 16-7108, slip op. (D.C. Cir. Aug. 1, 2017), finding the risk of future injury was not too speculative to establish injury in fact under Article III.  Continue Reading D.C. Circuit’s Article III Standing Decision Deepens Appellate Disagreement

On July 27, 2017, Lisa Sotto, chair of Hunton & Williams LLP’s Global Privacy and Cybersecurity practice, appeared live on Washington, DC’s Fox TV to discuss the ID theft issue involving former Dallas Cowboys player Lucky Whitehead, and to warn against the risk of identity theft. Sotto cautions that identity thieves who are determined and looking to do harm “will find [personal data].” According to Sotto, consumers “leave footprints everywhere online.” To mitigate risk of identity theft, Sotto advises against freely providing a Social Security number, shredding bank account statements, using complex passwords and avoiding public WiFi when checking bank accounts.

Watch her live interview.

On July 5, 2017, the FTC announced that Blue Global Media, LLC (“Blue Global”) agreed to settle charges that it misled consumers into filling out loan applications and then sold those applications, including sensitive personal information contained therein, to other entities without verifying how consumers’ information would be used or whether it would remain secure. According to the FTC’s complaint, Blue Global claimed it would connect loan applicants to lenders from its network of over 100 lenders in an effort to offer applicants the best terms. In reality, Blue Global “sold very few of the loan applications to lenders; did not match applications based on loan rates or terms; and sold the loan applications to the first buyer willing to pay for them.” The FTC alleged that, contrary to Blue Global’s representations, the company provided consumers’ sensitive information—including SSN and bank account number—to buyers without consumers’ knowledge or consent. The FTC further alleged that, upon receiving complaints from consumers that their personal information was being misused, Blue Global failed to investigate or take action to prevent harm to consumers. Continue Reading Lead Generation Business Settles FTC Charges That It Unlawfully Sold Consumer Data

On June 23, 2017, Anthem Inc., the nation’s second largest health insurer, reached a record $115 million settlement in a class action lawsuit arising out of a 2015 data breach that exposed the personal information of more than 78 million people. Among other things, the settlement creates a pool of funds to provide credit monitoring and reimbursement for out-of-pocket costs for customers, as well as up to $38 million in attorneys’ fees. Continue Reading Record Data Breach Settlement in Anthem Class Action

Recently, the Colorado Division of Securities (the “Division”) published cybersecurity regulations for broker-dealers and investment advisers regulated by the Division. Colorado’s cybersecurity regulations follow similar regulations enacted in New York that apply to certain state-regulated financial institutions. Continue Reading Colorado Publishes Cybersecurity Regulations for Financial Institutions

On March 21, 2017, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced that the New York Office of the Attorney General received over 1,300 data breach notifications in 2016, a 60 percent increase from 2015. The reported breaches led to the exposure of personal information of 1.6 million New York residents. According to the Attorney General’s report, 46 percent of the exposed personal information consisted of Social Security numbers, and 35 percent consisted of financial account information. Attorney General Schneiderman cited the updated New York State Department of Financial Services Cybersecurity Regulation as a means of addressing financial data breaches.

On March 17, 2017, the Federal Trade Commission announced that Upromise, Inc., (“Upromise”) agreed to pay $500,000 to settle allegations (the “Settlement”) that it violated the terms of a 2012 consent order (the “2012 Order”) that required Upromise to provide notice to consumers regarding its data collection and use practices, and obtain third-party audits. Continue Reading FTC Announces Settlement Over Alleged Consent Order Violation

On February 17, 2017, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey (“Horizon”) agreed to pay $1.1 million as part of a settlement with the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs (the “Division”) regarding allegations that Horizon did not adequately protect the privacy of nearly 690,000 policyholders. Continue Reading Health Insurer Reaches Privacy Settlement with New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs

On February 16, 2017, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) entered into a resolution agreement with Memorial Healthcare System (“Memorial”) that emphasized the importance of audit controls in preventing breaches of protected health information (“PHI”). The $5.5 million settlement with Memorial is the fourth enforcement action taken by OCR in 2017, and matches the largest civil monetary ever imposed against a single covered entity. Continue Reading OCR Settlement Emphasizes Importance of Audit Controls

On November 22, 2016, the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”)  announced a $650,000 settlement with University of Massachusetts Amherst (“UMass”), resulting from alleged violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”) Privacy and Security Rules.  Continue Reading HHS Announces HIPAA Settlement with UMass