Recently, Colorado’s governor signed into law House Bill 18-1128 “concerning strengthening protections for consumer data privacy” (the “Bill”), which takes effect September 1, 2018. Among other provisions, the Bill (1) amends the state’s data breach notification law to require notice to affected Colorado residents and the Colorado Attorney General within 30 days of determining that a security breach occurred, imposes content requirements for the notice to residents and expands the definition of personal information; (2) establishes data security requirements applicable to businesses and their third-party service providers; and (3) amends the state’s law regarding disposal of personal identifying information.

Key breach notification provisions of the Bill include:

  • Definition of Personal Information: The Bill amends Colorado’s breach notification law to define “personal information” as a Colorado resident’s first name or first initial and last name in combination with one or more of the following data elements: (1) Social Security number; (2) student, military or passport identification number; (3) driver’s license number or identification card number; (4) medical information; (5) health insurance identification number; or (6) biometric data. The amended law’s definition of “personal information” also includes a Colorado resident’s (1) username or email address in combination with a password or security questions and answers that would permit access to an online account and (2) account number or credit or debit card number in combination with any required security code, access code or password that would permit access to that account.
  • Attorney General Notification: If an entity must notify Colorado residents of a data breach, and reasonably believes that the breach has affected 500 or more residents, it must also provide notice to the Colorado Attorney General. Notice to the Attorney General is required even if the covered entity maintains its own procedures for security breaches as part of an information security policy or pursuant to state or federal law.
  • Timing: Notice to affected Colorado residents and the Colorado Attorney General must be made within 30 days after determining that a security breach occurred.
  • Content Requirements: The Bill also requires that notice to affected Colorado residents must include (1) the date, estimated date or estimated date range of the breach; (2) a description of the personal information acquired or reasonably believed to have been acquired; (3) contact information for the  entity; (4) the toll-free numbers, addresses and websites for consumer reporting agencies and the FTC; and (5) a statement that the Colorado resident can obtain information from the FTC and the credit reporting agencies about fraud alerts and security freezes. If the breach involves a Colorado resident’s username or email address in combination with a password or security questions and answers that would permit access to an online account, the entity must also direct affected individuals to promptly change their password and security questions and answers, or to take other steps appropriate to protect the individual’s online account with the entity and all other online accounts for which the individual used the same or similar information.

Key data security and disposal provisions of the Bill include:

  • Definition of Personal Identifying Information: The Bill defines personal identifying information as “a social security number; a personal identification number; a password; a pass code; an official state or government-issued driver’s license or identification card number; a government passport number; biometric data…; an employer, student, or military identification number; or a financial transaction device.”
  • Applicability: The information security and disposal provisions of the Bill apply to “covered entities,” defined as persons that maintain, own or license personal identifying information in the course of the person’s business, vocation or occupation.
  • Protection of Personal Identifying Information: The Bill requires a covered entity that maintains, owns or licenses personal identifying information to implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices appropriate to the nature of the personal identifying information it holds, and the nature and size of the business and its operations.
  • Third-Party Service Providers: Under the Bill, a covered entity that discloses information to a third-party service provider must require the service provider to implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices that are (1) appropriate to the nature of the personal identifying information disclosed and (2) reasonably designed to help protect the personal identifying information from unauthorized access, use, modification, disclosure or destruction. A covered entity does not need to require a third-party service provider to do so if the covered entity agrees to provide its own security protection for the information it discloses to the provider.
  • Written Disposal Policy: The Bill requires covered entities to create a written policy for the destruction or proper disposal of paper and electronic documents containing personal identifying information that requires the destruction of those documents when they are no longer needed. A covered entity is deemed in compliance with this section of the Bill if it is regulated by state or federal law and maintains procedures for disposal of personal identifying information pursuant to that law.

On June 12, 2018, Vietnam’s parliament approved a new cybersecurity law  that contains data localization requirements, among other obligations. Technology companies doing business in the country will be required to operate a local office and store information about Vietnam-based users within the country. The law also requires social media companies to remove offensive content from their online service within 24 hours at the request of the Ministry of Information and Communications and the Ministry of Public Security’s cybersecurity task force. Companies could face substantial penalties for failure to disclose information upon governmental request. In addition, the law bans internet users in Vietnam from organizing people for anti-state purposes and imposes broad restrictions on using speech to distort the country’s history or achievements. As reported in BNA Privacy Law Watch, the law will take effect on January 1, 2019.

On May 16, 2018, the Irish Data Protection Bill 2018 (the “Bill”) entered the final committee stage in Dáil Éireann (the lower house and principal chamber of the Irish legislature). The Bill was passed by the Seanad (the upper house of the legislature) at the end of March 2018. In the current stage, final statements on the Bill will be made before it is signed into law by the President. Continue Reading Irish Data Protection Bill in Final Committee Stage Before the Irish Legislature

On May 14, 2018, the Centre for Information Policy Leadership (“CIPL”) at Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP published a study on how the ePrivacy Regulation will affect the design and user experiences of digital services (the “Study”). The Study was prepared by Normally, a data product and service design studio, whom CIPL had asked for an independent expert opinion on user experience design. Continue Reading CIPL Publishes Study on How the ePrivacy Regulation will Affect the Design of Digital Services

On May 1, 2018, the Information Security Technology – Personal Information Security Specification (the “Specification”) went into effect in China. The Specification is not binding and cannot be used as a direct basis for enforcement. However, enforcement agencies in China can still use the Specification as a reference or guideline in their administration and enforcement activities. For this reason, the Specification should be taken seriously as a best practice in personal data protection in China, and should be complied with where feasible. Continue Reading National Standard on Personal Information Security Goes into Effect in China

On April 11, 2018, the Article 29 Working Party (the “Working Party”) adopted two Recommendations on the Standard Application for Approval of Data Controller or Processor Binding Corporate Rules for the Transfer of Personal Data (the “Recommendations”). Binding Corporate Rules (“BCRs”) are one of the mechanisms offered to companies to transfer data outside the European Economic Area to a country which does not provide an adequate level of protection for the data according to Article 45 of the GDPR. These Recommendations, in the form of questionnaires, are intended to help BCR applicants demonstrate how they fulfill the requirements of Article 47 of the GDPR. Continue Reading Article 29 Working Party Releases Updated Standard Application Forms for BCRs

The Belgian Privacy Commission (the “Belgian DPA”) recently released a Recommendation (in French and Dutch) on Data Protection Impact Assessment (“DPIA”) and the prior consultation requirements under Articles 35 and 36 of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) (the “Recommendation”). The Recommendation aims to provide guidance on the core elements and requirements of a DPIA, the different actors involved and specific provisions. Continue Reading Belgian Privacy Commission Issues Recommendation on Data Protection Impact Assessment

On March 20, 2018, the Centre for Information Policy Leadership (“CIPL”) at Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP issued a factsheet outlining relevant GDPR provisions for negotiations surrounding the proposed ePrivacy Regulation (the “Factsheet”). Continue Reading CIPL Issues Factsheet on Key Issues Relating to the Relationship Between the Proposed ePrivacy Regulation and the GDPR