On July 22, 2019, the FTC announced that Equifax agreed to pay at least $575 million, and potentially up to $700 million, as part of a global settlement agreement with the FTC, the CFPB, and 50 U.S. states and territories to resolve investigations into the colossal data breach the company suffered in 2017. This is the largest data breach settlement in U.S. history.
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As reported in the Hunton Employment & Labor Perspectives Blog:

On November 2, 2015, a putative class action was filed against retailer Big Lots Stores, Inc. in Philadelphia, stemming from allegations that the company “systematically” violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act’s (“FCRA’s”) “standalone disclosure requirement” by making prospective employees sign a document used as a background check consent form that contained extraneous information. Among other things, the plaintiff alleges that Big Lots’ form violates the FCRA because it includes the following three categories of extraneous information: (1) an “implied liability waiver” (specifically, a statement that the applicant “fully understand[s] that all employment decisions are based on legitimate nondiscriminatory reasons”); (2) state-specific notices; and (3) information on how background information will be gathered and from which sources, statements pertaining to disputing any information, and the name and contact information of the consumer reporting agency.


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On November 15, 2013, the People’s Bank of China issued Administrative Measures for Credit Reference Agencies. The measures, which will take effect on December 20, 2013, are intended to enhance the supervision and regulation of credit reference agencies and serve as yet another example of the Chinese government’s increased attention to personal information protection issues.
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