Court of Justice of the European Union

On September 28, 2020, the U.S. Department of Commerce, along with the U.S. Department of Justice and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, released a White Paper entitled Information on U.S. Privacy Safeguards Relevant to SCCs and Other EU Legal Bases for EU-U.S. Data Transfers after Schrems II (the “White Paper”). The White Paper outlines privacy safeguards in and updates to the U.S. surveillance provisions flagged by the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) in its Schrems II decision. It is intended to serve as a resource for companies transferring personal data from the EU to the U.S. in the wake of the CJEU’s decision overturning the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield. Particularly, it focuses on companies relying on Standard Contractual Clauses (“SCCs”) for data transfers, and provides information to help them determine whether the U.S. ensures adequate privacy protections for companies’ data.

Continue Reading U.S. Government Issues White Paper on Data Transfers after Schrems II Decision

On July 28, 2020, German supervisory authorities issued a statement reiterating the requirement for additional safeguards when organizations rely on Standard Contractual Clauses or Binding Corporate Rules for the transfer of personal data to third countries in the wake of the Court of Justice of the European Union’s invalidation of the Privacy Shield Framework.
Continue Reading Schrems II Update: German SAs Require Additional Safeguards for U.S. Transfers and Max Schrems Set to Challenge Facebook Data Transfers Again

On July 16, 2020, the Court of Justice of the European Union issued its landmark judgment in the Schrems II case, concluding that the Standard Contractual Clauses issued by the European Commission for the transfer of personal data to data processors established outside of the EU are valid. Unexpectedly, the Court invalidated the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield framework.
Continue Reading BREAKING: Unexpected Outcome of Schrems II Case: CJEU Invalidates EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework but Standard Contractual Clauses Remain Valid