On January 15, 2019, the UK House of Commons rejected the draft Brexit Withdrawal Agreement negotiated between the UK Prime Minister and the EU by a margin of 432-202. While the magnitude of the loss sets in motion a process which could potentially have resulted in an early general election being held, on January 16 a majority of British Members of Parliament rejected a vote of no confidence in Theresa May’s government.

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As we previously reported in February 2017, an Illinois federal judge denied a motion to dismiss two complaints brought under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, 740 ILCS 14 (“BIPA”) by individuals who alleged that Google captured, without plaintiff’s consent, biometric data from facial scans of images that were uploaded onto Google Photos. The cases subsequently were consolidated, and on December 29, 2018, the Northern District of Illinois dismissed the case on standing grounds, finding that despite the existence of statutory standing under BIPA, neither plaintiff had claimed any injury that would support Article III standing.

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The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) recently announced the publication of “Health Industry Cybersecurity Practices: Managing Threats and Protecting Patients” (the “Cybersecurity Practices”). The Cybersecurity Practices were developed by the Healthcare & Public Health Sector Coordinating Councils Public Private Partnership, a group comprised of over 150 cybersecurity and healthcare experts from government and private industry.

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On December 21, 2018, the Irish Data Protection Commission (the “DPC”) published preliminary guidance on data transfers to and from the UK in the event of a “no deal” Brexit (the “Guidance”). The Guidance is relevant for any Irish entities that transfer personal data to the UK, including Northern Ireland.

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On December 20, 2018, the French data protection authority (the “CNIL”) announced that it levied a €400,000 fine on Uber France SAS, the French establishment of Uber B.V. and Uber Technologies Inc., for failure to implement some basic security measures that made possible the 2016 Uber data breach. Continue Reading CNIL Fines Uber for Data Security Failure Related to 2016 Data Breach

On November 23, 2018, both Australia and Chinese Taipei joined the APEC Cross-Border Privacy Rules (“CBPR”) system. The system is a regional multilateral cross-border transfer mechanism and an enforceable privacy code of conduct and certification developed for businesses by the 21 APEC member economies.

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The Agency of Access to Public Information (Agencia de Acceso a la Información Pública) (“AAIP”) has approved a set of guidelines for binding corporate rules (“BCRs”), a mechanism that multinational companies may use in cross-border data transfers to affiliates in countries with inadequate data protection regimes under the AAIP.

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In connection with its hearings on data security, the Federal Trade Commission hosted a December 12 panel discussion on “The U.S. Approach to Consumer Data Security.” Moderated by the FTC’s Deputy Director for Economic Analysis James Cooper, the panel featured private practitioners Lisa Sotto, from Hunton Andrews Kurth, and Janis Kestenbaum, academics Daniel Solove (GW Law School) and David Thaw (University of Pittsburgh School of Law), and privacy advocate Chris Calabrese (Center for Democracy and Technology). Lisa set the stage with an overview of the U.S. data security framework, highlighting the complex web of federal and state rules and influential industry standards that result in a patchwork of overlapping mandates. Panelists debated the effect of current law and enforcement on companies’ data security programs before turning to the “optimal” framework for a U.S. data security regime. Among the details discussed were establishing a risk-based approach with a baseline set of standards and clear process requirements. While there was not uniform agreement on the specifics, the panelists all felt strongly that federal legislation was warranted, with the FTC taking on the role of principal enforcer.

Continue Reading Lisa Sotto, Head of Hunton’s Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice, Kicks Off FTC Data Security Panel