Australia Enacts New Data Breach Notification Law

On February 13, 2017, the Parliament of Australia passed legislation that amends the Privacy Act of 1988 (the “Privacy Act”) and requires companies with revenue over $3 million AUD ($2.3 million USD) to notify affected Australian residents and the Australian Information Commissioner (the “Commissioner”) in the event of an “eligible data breach.” Continue Reading

European Data Protection Supervisor Publishes Priorities for 2017

On February 15, 2017, the European Data Protection Supervisor (“EDPS”) published its Priorities for 2017 (the “EDPS Priorities”). The EDPS Priorities consist of a note listing the strategic priorities and a color-coded table listing the European Commission’s proposals that require the EDPS’ attention, sorted by level of priority. Continue Reading

China Publishes Draft Measures for Security Review of Network Products and Services

On February 4, 2017, the Cyberspace Administration of China published a draft of its proposed Measures for the Security Review of Network Products and Services (the “Draft”). Under the Cybersecurity Law of China, if an operator of key information infrastructure purchases network products and services that may affect national security, a security review is required. The Draft provides further hints of how these security reviews may actually be carried out, and is open for comment until March 4, 2017. Continue Reading

DPA of Argentina Issues Draft Data Protection Bill

As previously published on the Data Privacy Laws blog, Pablo A. Palazzi, partner at Buenos Aires law firm Allende & Brea, provides the following report.

Earlier this month, the Argentine Data Protection Agency (“DPA”) posted the first draft of a new data protection bill (the “Draft Bill”) on its website. Argentina’s current data protection bill was enacted in December 2000. Argentina was the first Latin American country to be recognized as an adequate country by the European Union. Continue Reading

House of Representatives Passes Email Privacy Act

On February 6, 2017, the House of Representatives suspended its rules and passed by voice vote H.R 387, the Email Privacy Act. As we previously reported, the Email Privacy Act amends the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (“ECPA”) of 1986. In particular, the legislation would require government entities to obtain a warrant, based on probable cause, before accessing the content of any emails or electronic communications stored with third-party service providers, regardless of how long the communications have been held in electronic storage by such providers. Continue Reading

FTC Announces Settlement Regarding Collecting Consumer TV Viewing Data

On February 6, 2017, the FTC announced that it has agreed to settle charges that VIZIO, Inc. (“VIZIO”), installed software on about 11 million consumer televisions to collect viewing data without consumers’ knowledge or consent. The stipulated federal court order requires VIZIO to pay $2.2 million to the FTC and New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs.  Continue Reading

OCR Issues Penalty for Noncompliance with HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules

On February 1, 2017, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) announced a $3.2 million civil monetary penalty against Children’s Medical Center of Dallas (“Children’s”) for alleged ongoing violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”) Privacy and Security Rules, following two consecutive breaches of patient electronic protected health information (“ePHI”). This is the third enforcement action taken by OCR in 2017, following the respective actions taken against MAPFRE Life Insurance of Puerto Rico and Presence Health earlier in January. Continue Reading

UK Government Quizzed on GDPR Implementation and Post-Brexit Data Protection

On February 1, 2017, Matt Hancock, the UK Government Minister responsible for data protection, was questioned by the House of Lords committee on the UK’s implementation plan of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) in the context of the UK’s looming exit from the EU. In responding to the questioning, Hancock revealed further details into the UK Government’s position on implementing the GDPR into UK law. Continue Reading

UK Government Releases Plan for Exiting the EU

On February 2, 2017, the UK government published a white paper entitled The United Kingdom’s exit from and new partnership with the European Union (the “white paper”). The white paper strikes a conciliatory tone, making it clear that the UK intends to maintain close ties with the European Union and its 27 remaining Member States after Brexit. A large portion of the white paper is devoted to discussing the issues at the heart of the 2016 Brexit referendum, such as immigration controls, continuing trade with the EU and the protection of individuals’ rights conferred under EU law. Among the rights addressed is the free flow of personal data between the UK and the EU. Continue Reading

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